Author: Christopher McDonald

Charlie Hebdo, Muslims, and Satire

Much of the world is still reeling from the events of last Wednesday, when two French Muslims entered the offices of the satire magazine Charlie Hebdo and began shooting. The attack was brutal, as the attackers killed 10 employees including the magazine’s editor and four cartoonists. The BBC reports that the attackers declared that they had, “avenged the Prophet Muhammad.” Upon leaving the building, the gunmen engaged in a shoot-out with Parisian military police. They concluded their attack by shooting an officer as he lay on pavement, begging for his life. The dead policeman was, reportedly, a Muslim. The shooters, brothers Said and...

Read More

Are Alleged Rapists Automatically Guilty?

Over the last year, there has been a riotous debate over America’s rape culture. According to liberal sources, our society suffers from an epidemic of rapes which are under-reported to police, women are sexualized by the media (chiefly by men), and the mistreatment of women is normalized. When women accuse men of rape, the victims are blamed and police are apathetic when pursuing rape allegations. This culture of rape has become one of the latest crusades by the feminist left: convicted of the virtue of their ideas about rape, feminist activists have gone on the march to stamp out...

Read More

The Case of the Despicable Donor

It has recently come to light that a political figure in Colorado state history may have been a part of the Sand Creek Massacre, which occurred on November 19, 1864. At Sand Creek, between 70 and 163 peaceful Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians were slaughtered by the Colorado and New Mexico state forces, led by the bloody-minded commander Col. John Chivington. Supposedly, the figure behind that commander was John Evans, territorial governor of Colorado under Abraham Lincoln. John Evans (1814-1897) is an eminent figure, and not just for his role as the second Colorado Territorial Governor from 1862-1865: he also helped to found...

Read More

What is Still Not Seen

The French classical Liberal Frederic Bastiat penned a famous essay titled That Which is Seen And That Which is Not Seen. In it, Bastiat dealt with several basic fallacies in economic thinking. Given that Bastiat was perhaps the clearest economic writer in history, one would hope that the fallacies would have faded, but such is not the case. Fallacies repeat themselves over and over, subject to an intellectual form of Gresham’s Law: bad ideas drive out good. The fallacy Bastiat points out is the thinking that, because money is spent upon a particular purchase by someone, it must be...

Read More

Ben Affleck: The Un-Socrates

In Athens, in the year 399 B.C.E., a man gave a defense of himself. Accused of teaching new gods, and of corrupting the youth of the city, he responded famously. An oracle of Apollo said that none was wiser than he, which the defendant took to mean that he am wise because he knew that he was not. That man was Socrates, and his awareness of his own limits was part of what made him a great man. His quest for wisdom made him an immortal figure for history, one of two deaths which fundamentally shaped Western civilization. Today,...

Read More
Get Our Newsletter

Get Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to get breaking news delivered to your inbox.

You have Successfully Subscribed!